Chromatin motion in neuronal interphase nuclei
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Chromatin motion in neuronal interphase nuclei changes induced by disruption of intermediate filaments.

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Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesCanadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18682190M
ISBN 100315565217
OCLC/WorldCa24907383

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  Acad. 5eL 4 De Boni U. & Mintz A.H. () Curvilinear, three- dimensional motion of chromatin domains and nucleoli in neuronal interphase nuclei. Science , 5 Felsenfeld by: Nuclear rotation (NR) refers to the motion of chromatin domains in interphase nuclei of several cell types, including neurons, in vitro. It has been proposed that NR may function, during cellular differentiation, in the transposition of specific chromatin domains into the cytotypic chromosome pattern known to exist in interphase nuclei. It is controversial whether NR represents motion of.   Interphase Chromatin Is Highly Dynamic. The initial surprise from this approach was the extremely dynamic behavior that chromatin exhibits in both yeast andDrosophila nuclei ().The characterization of these rapid movements required high-speed image acquisition by either charge-coupled device–based deconvolution or scanning confocal by: 2. Chromatin structural changes in stem cell differentiation. Chromatin, as well as other features of nuclear architecture, is distinct in ES cells from differentiating or somatic cells in many respects (Meshorer, ; Meshorer and Misteli, ).Heterochromatin foci are fewer, larger and dispersed in undifferentiated mouse ES cells (see Figure 1) and the organization of chromatin structure.

  Nuclear rotation (NR) refers to the motion of chromatin domains in interphase nuclei of several cell types, including neurons, in has been proposed that NR may function, during cellular differentiation, in the transposition of specific chromatin domains into the cytotypic chromosome pattern known to exist in interphase nuclei.   Background: In comparison with many nuclear proteins, the movement of chromatin in nuclei appears to be generally constrained. These restrictions on motion are proposed to reflect the attachment of chromatin to immobile nuclear s: To gain insight into the regulation of chromosome dynamics by nuclear architecture, we have followed the movements of different sites in . Abstract. Chromatin as a functional whole.. Since the nineteen-fifties (1,2), studies on the histochemistry of the nucleus have been based on its concept as a whole: measurement of the DNA content, and the ratio between nucleus size and cell size appeared to be (and were in effect) an indication of the functional status of the single cell and of the cell population. Nuclear rotation (NR) is typically measured as motion of nucleoli within nuclei of cells in vitro. This occurs in cycling cells. However, its observation in neurons arrested in interphase indicates that mechanisms related to mitosis are not a prerequisite. We have recently shown that NR occurs in three dimensions within the nuclear space, that it occurs within the space delineated by the outer.

  Hay M, De Boni U. Chromatin motion in neuronal interphase nuclei: changes induced by disruption of intermediate filaments. Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. ; – doi: /cm Specific interactions of chromatin with the nuclear envelope (NE) in early embryos of Drosophila melanogaster have been mapped and analyzed. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the three-dimensional positions of 42 DNA probes, primarily to chromosome 2L, have been mapped in nuclei of intact Drosophila embryos, revealing five euchromatic and two heterochromatic regions associated . rearrangement of chromatin during interphase. These include curvilinear, three-dimensional movement of heterochromatin in interphase nuclei of living neuron cells (De and Mintz, ), and the occasional slow movement of a centromere in living HeLa cells (Shelby et al., ). The location and the.   Curvilinear, three-dimensional motion of chromatin domains and nucleoli in neuronal interphase nuclei. Science. ; Crossref; Scopus (59) Google Scholar], raising the question of whether the observed curvilinear motion could be explained by a similar nuclear rotation. Previous work combining nuclear pore staining with optical.